As cannabis modernization efforts continue to work their way through the political process in Germany, one major hurdle that worried some cannabis policy observers inside and outside of Germany was the Federal Council (or Bundesrat) review component of the process.

Cannabis opponents within the Federal Council made it clear that they intended to derail legalization when provided the opportunity, but fortunately, they did not succeed.

The Federal Council considered the measure that was previously approved by the Federal Cabinet, and while amendments were approved, an outright blockage did not receive enough support.

Bavaria’s representative filed a motion in an attempt to stall the measure, however, that motion was rejected. Various other amendments were also rejected, including one that would have increased the legal age for adult-use cannabis, as first reported by Marijuana Moment.

One area that representatives did agree on was the role of individual states regarding administrative costs to implement and carry out national legalization. In total, 81 recommended amendments were adopted by the chamber, and they will now go to the Federal Cabinet for consideration and response.

The battle is far from over, however, national legalization in Germany passed a major procedural step and that is worthy of celebrating. Below is a response put out by our friends at DHV after the proceedings:

On Friday, the Federal Council decided on its statement on the CanG. Thanks to your help, the decisions were significantly milder than was feared. Over 8,000 people took part in our campaign and sent emails to the traffic light groups.

A total of 81 points of criticism of the planned CanG found a majority in the Federal Council’s specialist committees, which meant that they were put on the Bundesrat’s agenda as a draft resolution. These included many points that called for the law to be tightened.

In addition to the 81 points that had been decided, a single motion was submitted for a vote again, even though it had not found a majority in the committee: The CSU absolutely wanted to have the motion voted on again so that the Federal Council fundamentally rejects the law completely.

This means that the radical anti-cannabis party from Bavaria has failed. The demand to declare the law requiring approval also did not find a majority. A number of other repressive requests were rejected. 

Before the vote, the state parliamentary groups obviously looked at which resolutions should be blocked, certainly strongly motivated by thousands of emails on the topic. 

You can find out which resolutions were rejected, which ones made it through and what it all means in the DHV news. The law will be officially introduced into the Bundestag on October 13th, perhaps garnished with a few speeches before it goes on to committees for discussion.

The CSU wants to be the biggest opponent of cannabis reform. Every week, Bavaria’s Health Minister Holetschek (CSU) drives a new pig through the village. 

Last week it was announced that they wanted to combat cannabis consumption with a central control unit if the law were to pass despite Bavaria’s resistance. This anti-cannabis authority should also be responsible for applications from cannabis social clubs. 

Meanwhile, party leader Söder is having a bullshit duel with Free Voters leader Aiwanger while Oktoberfest is in full swing: Who has the stupidest arguments against cannabis legalization? We are now responding to this special role of the Bavarian government with a poster campaign in Bavaria around the state elections next weekend:

“Time for legalization! Cannabis belongs to Bavaria. Longer than the CSU!” 

Our advertising columns are already at the start in Munich. The first photo of this reached us via tweet from Carmen Wegge (SPD), who chose our poster directly in front of the Bavarian State Parliament for the picture above. 

Your Christmas donations made this campaign possible! If you spot one, please send us photos of the posters and information about the location to kontakt@hanfverband.de. 

In addition to Munich, it will be from October 6th. there will be further posters in Fürth, Ingolstadt and Augsburg. These posters will still be hanging after the election and will help the CSU interpret the expected voter losses.

Hempy greetings,
your DHV team

  • Johnny Green is the Media and Content Director for the International Cannabis Business Conference and has blogged about cannabis since January 2010.

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